Et après?

Page 16 sur 40 Précédent  1 ... 9 ... 15, 16, 17 ... 28 ... 40  Suivant

Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Burt le Mer 2 Sep - 10:29

Euh, je ne vois pas vraiment de propagande dans ce qui est dit.
Il est vrai que le premier paragraphe est une charge virulente contre svoboda mais je ne connais cette organisation que par les média, je ne ne sais pas dans quelles proportions ce qu'il dit est exagéré. On sens qu'il est hostile au nationalisme c'est tout.
Le reste de l'article est à mon avis assez juste. Tout au plus, plutôt que de dire qu'il n'y a pas eu d'offensive il aurait pu dire offensives limitées car celles qui ont eu lieues donnaient plus l'impression d'avoir été lancées par des hommes qui n'y connaissent rien à la guerre. Du genre lancés par des hommes qui allaient à la chasse plutôt qu'à l'assaut de positions tenues par l'armée.
Burt
Burt

Messages : 3
Date d'inscription : 27/08/2015
Age : 47
Localisation : Niort

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Mer 2 Sep - 11:05

Un peu plus sur le contenu de la décentralisation:

Ukraine’s decentralization and Donbas “special status”: what you need to know

On Monday, August 31, clashes erupted at a protest against decentralization law outside Ukraine’s parliament. Key opposition figures and parliamentary coalition parties protested the reform, claiming it would legalize Kremlin’s proxies in Ukraine. Experts admit Poroshenko’s administration failed to convey the true meaning of this reform to the public. This, in turn, lead to politicians capitalizing on the ensuing uncertainty, which culminated with 1 dead and over 100 wounded (mostly policemen due to a grenade attack at the Rada).

We looked through the decentralization laws to find out what they really mean.


Origins

Since independence Ukraine has suffered from the Soviet legacy of an extremely centralized system. The concentration of power and finances in the capital allowed for institutionalized corruption, perhaps best symbolized by Yanukovych’s Mezhihirya residence. Decentralization has been among the demands of Maidan protestors who ultimately toppled Yanukovych’s regime. You can read on the origins of decentralization in more detail here.

Decentralization is included as a requirement from Ukraine set in the Minsk agreement signed by Ukraine, Russia and its proxies in February this year. Under its provisions, Ukraine must adopt constitutional reform taking into account the specifics of Donbas regions.


The reform

On July 16, Ukraine’s parliament put the presidential administration’s decentralization bill on the agenda and sent it to the Constitutional court for approval. On July 31 it was OK’ed by the CC. A month later, it passed the 1st hearing with a majority of 265 (with 300 needed for the bill to pass second hearing).

The reform’s proponents point out it is shifting more power from Kyiv to the local communities. The draft law organizes local governments into three tiers: from the community (“hromada”) to county (“raion”) to region. In lieu of powerful presidential-appointed regional governors, it introduces prefects for regions and counties which are tasked with coordinating local and state authorities and controlling the legality of county and regional councils’ decrees.

The constitutional amendments define local council powers in pretty broad strokes, most prominent being levying local taxes and defining economic and social policies of their constituents. Other important things include local referendums on key issues of the community and a guarantee that any increase in local powers would be followed with an increase of local budget.

Experts believe the law in its current form leaves loopholes for abusing of power by the President and presidential-appointed prefects (such as annulling decrees by local councils or dissolving them altogether upon a court decision). However, the reform’s proponents (including Poroshenko himself) praise the reform as a shift of power to local communities.

The point of contention

According to the draft, the new constitution would explicitly provide for special status of only its capital, Kyiv. However, the most controversial line of the constitutional amendment is article 18 of the “Transitional Provisions”, which says the following:

“The specifics of executing local governance in certain counties of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions are defined by a separate law”
Poroshenko insists this is in no way a “special status” provision and part of Ukraine’ obligations under Minsk agreements (which, according to the administration, Ukraine adheres to while Russia and its proxies do not). Critics of the Minsk agreements say that this provision was imposed on Ukraine by outside forces and constitutes capitulation before Russia’s invasion and legitimizing the Donbas “republics.” An appeal by Ukrainian intellectuals to the President stresses that the reform constitures “geopolitical subordination to the dictates of Russia.” Ian Bond, the director of foreign policy at the Center for European Reform, claims that Russia’s participation in the negotiation process invalidates the outcome, and that instead of pressuring Ukraine, the West should be helping Ukraine defend itself.

Some ground for those claims may be seen in the “separate law.”

The “Special status law”

The bill “On the special order of local governance in certain counties of Donetsk and Luhansk regions” was passed by the Ukrainian (Yanukovych-era) parliament on September 16, hot on the heels of the first Minsk agreement. It covers the territories currently occupied by Russian hybrid troops.

The law understandably caused trouble with Ukrainian patriotic opposition due to such provisions as a broad amnesty to “participants of the events in Donetsk and Luhansk regions.” It is unclear how far this amnesty would stretch and if “events” include murder and acts of terror committed by the militants.

Other controversial provisions are the extended status of Russian language as well as cross-border cooperation with local authorities of Russian border communities. Another point of content is the provision for “local militia units” created by local councils. On one hand, this sure looks like legitimizing DNR and LNR terrorists. On the other hand, a “militia” member should be a citizen of Ukraine and a resident of the community in question, meaning mercenaries from Russia wouldn’t be able to stay.

In March 2015, after the so-called “Minsk II” which defined a road map towards peace in Ukraine, the “special governance” law was amended to the effect that most of its provisions would come into force only after local elections under Ukrainian law and monitored by international observers would take place. This angered the “rebels” and the Kremlin, ostensibly because it allowed for little to none Moscow control over occupied Donbas. A year after the law (itself limited by three years) was passed, the elections in question (that would have to include Ukrainian nationalist parties) are still to take place. Under Minsk agreement, the constitutional reform also comes after pulling out foreign troops from Donbas and return of border control to Ukraine.

Bottom line


  • The decentralization reform proposed by Poroshenko’s administration has its merits and drawbacks.
  • The main controversy is the special law for Donbas counties’ governance provided for in the Constitution.
  • The law in question has controversial provisions like amnesty and “local militias” but will not come into effect before Ukrainian border control is restored, Russian troops pull out and elections under Ukrainian law take place. It is currently to remain in force for two more years
  • The administration claims the reform is in line with Maidan demands and Minsk agreement
  • The opposition believes the “special status law” amounts to capitulation before the Kremlin under international pressure



Ukrainian MP Hanna Hopko on the controversial decentralization vote

 Et après? - Page 16 O-HONG-KONG-facebook

Article by: Hanna Hopko


Monday, August 31 was marked with violent clashes in Kyiv over a key decentralization reform vote in the Ukrainian parliament. The reform has its proponents and critics, the main point of contention being provisions for special local governance in certain Donbas counties currently occupied by Russia’s hybrid troops. Hanna Hopko, Euromaidan activist, frontrunner of pro-Europe Samopomich [“Self-Help”] party during the 2014 parliamentary elections and winner of Foreign Policy’s 2014 Global Thinkers award, voted for the decentralization constitutional amendments along with 4 other members of the Samopomich faction and was expelled for going against Samopomich’s rejection of the law.

In a FB post, Hopko explained her reasons for supporting the decentralization bill and sharply criticized its critics, the instigators of the clashes and Samopomich’s slip into what she calls “Bolshevik authoritarianism”.

Today’s constitutional amendment vote is an important step towards comprehensive change in Ukraine. Decentralization, moving the power to the localities – communities, counties and regions – is one key demands of the Maidan revolution which is now implemented via constitutional amendments. This is why it was so important for me to vote for these changes. This is also the reason why those who don’t want to give away power and money from the capital to the localities feel it’s so important to disrupt those changes. Here’s the root of the lies that the law has provisions on “special status of Donbas” or “recognizing LNR and DNR”. The law’s draft has none of that. The very fact that the draft has no concessions to Russia but just a reference to a separate law regulating local governance in certain counties of Donbas does not give any privileges to these regions and also becomes Ukraine’s flexible tool for returning those territories, sets Moscow’s teeth on end.

Those who campaign against constitutional amendments are voluntarily or involuntarily supporting the aggressor in reaching several goals – provoking civic conflict, breaking the parliamentary coalition, disrupting decentralization reforms and removing Western support from Ukraine. This is a plan to weaken Ukraine and give Moscow a free hand in escalating the aggression, which could have grave consequences for our country.
The most cynical part is that the attack on the amendment draft is done und
er patriotic slogans. In truth, it defends the interests of several parties ahead of the local elections, the interests of the oligarchs and the aggressor country.
Is there any difference between those throwing grenades at the National Guard in front of the Rada and those who shoot at the same National Guardsmen on the frontlines?
The responsibility for the blood spilled and provoking the conflict lies with the politicians who promoted the lies on the constitutional amendment draft, instilled hatred based on those lies and keep towing that line, undermining the country from within.

The perpetrators of the bloody attack must be punished.

And those who followed the provocateurs unconsciously should reflect on where these games have brought the country and what could happen if this doesn’t stop.

Let us recall the lessons of history. Let us recall how many times the Ukrainian state fell due to chaos, ambitions of “true patriots” deftly manipulated by foreign enemies who turned them into a tool of destruction. Can’t we learn from our mistakes? Haven’t we learned anything from what we’ve experienced by ourselves during the past 1.5 – 2 years?

P.S. Concerning the expulsion of myself and four of my colleagues from the Samopomich faction (just for supporting the Constitutional amendments desperately needed by local communities) – I feel ashamed that a party which was supposed to be a modern, democtatic alternative, is sliding into populism and Bolshevik authoritatianism. We remain true to our goals and principles we went to the 2014 elections with, including promises of comprehensive decentralization and transferring power to local communities.
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 3 Sep - 10:20

Excellent article de Yuriy Kulikov avec données macro-économiques et comparaisons internationales : comment l'Ukraine s'est enfoncée dans la récession pendant 26 ans de prévarications et d'immobilisme et quelles sont les solutions pour s'en sortir aujourd'hui



History of success
03.09.2015 | 08:50
Yuriy Kulikov


Ukraine badly needs a history of success of both a young state and its citizens. Moreover, it must be a success not of some corrupt individuals stealing state assets, but of millions of ordinary Ukrainians, who would have been able to provide for their families with their honest work.
We all need to break free of a miserable 24-year-standstill.
In 1990, Ukraine’s GDP was about $90 billion. Our economy at the time was similar to that of Greece, Iran and Thailand. At the same time, with $1,748 in terms of GDP per capita Ukraine was 106th.
Now, as long 25 years have passed, the country's economy, excluding its shadow part estimated at 47% has a $84 billion GDP (pessimists say, it’s $70 billion), with $1,964 GDP per capita (42.8 million people). This is at the same level as Uganda and the Solomon Islands, at the bottom of the list of the world's poorest states!
For example, neighboring Poland with 38 million people was actually behind Ukraine in economic terms 25 years ago. However, in 2015, it enjoys a nominal GDP of about $490 billion and $12.900 GDP per capita. Greece’s GDP amid deep economic crisis is projected at $240 billion by year end, while the struggling economy  of Thailand is expected to see a $375 billion GDP.
Perhaps economists of the World Bank will use a different methodology to asses the Ukrainian economy, but the facts are relentless. We live in a poor country with a meager budget and poverty-stricken population.
While other nations have evolved, taking tough decisions, making and then correcting their mistakes on their way, we have degraded, remaining in a standstill, however embarrassing it would be to admit.
Why did this happen? I believe that most of our citizens, earning an honest living, will respond in a similar way:  it is all caused by corruption, inefficient public administration system and misguided economic model.
Can Ukraine finally learn the lesson in the background of a bloody and costly war Russia has unleashed against us? Can we finally start moving forward?
Yes, it can! To do this, we need to address several priority issues:
- To accept the popular concept of zero tolerance to corruption. Not to give and not to take bribes, not to use authority for personal gain. To cleanse public offices, including the judiciary system, of all corruption-stained officials;
- To defy populism, upgrade the system of state and municipal power to minimize its interference in the economy;
- To change our raw materials-oriented economic model built on oligarchic capital; stimulate business development, entrepreneurship and creation of new jobs in all possible ways; develop the internal market, and those areas of the economy that will be essential in 20 - 50 years old: processing of agricultural products, IT, energy efficiency, and aeronautics;
- To invest in the reform of secondary and higher education, focusing on the real needs of tomorrow's market;
- To complete out an exemplary privatization of state assets, attracting global innovative leaders to the country's economy. Attracting foreign investment must be our major priority;
- To provide for a comfortable environment, repair damaged roads and replace corroded pipes.
These are the goals which should be looking for in political agendas of political forces ahead of the upcoming local and parliamentary elections. We should not vote for populists who promise waiver on foreign currency debt and a 70% reduction of utility bills. We should not support infantile politicians, unable to take responsibility for the tough but vital decisions.
Finally, it's time to stop whining and complaining. We should roll up our sleeves and start working! We can’t improve our karma with mutual squabbles and pathetic cries "The end is near!" It’s time to create our own history of success.
Yuriy Kulikov
Read more on UNIAN: http://www.unian.info/politics/1118181-history-of-success.html
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Jeu 3 Sep - 10:42

Effectivement, très bon article.
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 3 Sep - 14:35

New quasi passée inaperçue : Oleg Lyashko, Président du Parti Radical a quitté la coalition de gouvernement de Yatseniouk avec ses 22 députés le 1er septembre, avant le vote sur la décentralisation des régions. Il a affirmé : "Nous assistons à une nouvelle coalition entre Poroshenko et le Parti des Régions" (pro-russe)


Je vous livre l'article en question et je vous livre quelques commentaires perso après :

Lyashko faction quits coalition
01.09.2015 | 14:55

The faction of the Radical Party has left the parliamentary coalition, the party leader Oleh Lyashko has told the reporters.



Et après? - Page 16 1437671823-5429-lyashko
Lyashko and his Radical Party quit coalition / Photo from UNIAN
"Yesterday a new coalition was actually created in Parliament - with the Party of Regions,” said Lyashko
He noted that the faction of the Radical Party "sees it impossible to continue being in the coalition, which was actually destroyed yesterday by the hands of President Poroshenko and Chairman of Parliament Hroisman, who contrary to the position of the majority of the coalition factions submitted the issue of Constitutional amendments to Parliament’s consideration, which resulted in deaths on the Maidan near the Verkhovna Rada, these bloody provocations, which led to hundreds of victims."

Read more on UNIAN: http://www.unian.info/politics/1117546-lyashko-faction-quits-coalition.html


Alors, je vous livre quelques commentaires perso qui valent ce qu'ils valent bien sûr ! On peut toujours en débattre...

Comme l'a écrit une journaliste Ukrainienne de talent : "l'enfer est pavé de bonnes intentions" et je crains beaucoup que cette "Loi de décentralisation des régions" ne soit que le prélude à un démembrement de l'Ukraine. Je m'explique : "autonomie du Donbass..." Elle existe déjà de fait !!!
Et après ? Qui pourra empêcher la montée en puissance des forces désagrégationistes et centrifuges de l'Ouest, en Galicie et Volhynie ? Pourquoi ne pas envisager le retour de ces régions dans les limites de l'ancienne république Polonaise ? Et les régions transcarpathiques au sein de la Hongrie ? et l'indépendance de l'Oblast d'Odessa ??? Qui peut l'affirmer ! Ne pas sous-estimer la fragilité des contours géographiques des anciens états de l'ex-URSS. L'exemple récent du démantèlement et du morcellement de l'ex-Fédération de Yougoslavie devrait nous servir d'avertissement...

Alors, les partis Nationalistes d'Ukraine sont à l'oeuvre : Samotomitch, Praviy Sektor, maintenant le Parti Radical se retrouvent désormais dans l'opposition politique à la ligne Poroshenko... C'est peut-être peu électoralement (bien que Lyashko ait fait 8% aux présidentielles de 2014) mais ne pas sous-estimer leur influence au sein de l'opinion publique Ukrainienne. Tiraillé entre le "pôle pro-Russe" et le "pôle Nationaliste" rejoint par Lyashko, le peuple Ukrainien suit encore Poroshenko mais pour combien de temps ??? Si la lutte anti-corruption et les résultats économiques ne sont pas au rendez-vous ou que la Russie poursuit son oeuvre de sabotage interne, quid de l'avenir  Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil

Quelques infos sur Lyashko, son parti n'est pas considéré comme "d'extême-droite" selon les critères occidentaux Wink C'est un patriote "radical" qui a demandé la peine de mort pour les militaires ukrainiens qui ont trahit leur pays pour rejoindre la Russie en Crimée. Il a proposé des textes de loi pour interdire le Parti Communiste et le Parti des Régions en Ukraine et il a constitué un bataillon de volontaires "Ukraine" qui s'est battu notamment à Torez.
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 3 Sep - 15:07

Suite de mon commentaire : je suis bien content de pouvoir continuer à poster librement chez Matt où on tolère toutes les opinions étayées et non outrancières sans qu'on vous dégringole sur le râble ! A l'inverses d'autres sites nous délayent dans une propagande bobo-humaniste naïve où certaines analyses alarmistes sont systématiquement ignorées...

Cela me fait penser à Munich 1938, quand Chamberlain, son sourire béat aux lèvres annonçait au peuple anglais : "Nous avons sauvé la paix !" Tandis que Daladier, acclamé à sa descente d'avion et beaucoup plus réaliste commentait en privé "Ah les cons !"

J'espérerais me tromper vis-à-vis de l'Ukraine mais je crois bien que la partie en face doit se frotter les mains de contentement... Avoir obtenu tout ça avec une pression moyenne et un minimum de morts, surtout s'il s'agit de Bouriates, Khirgizes ou Tchéthènes dont la vie compte peu, c'est une grande victoire !
La porte est désormais grande ouverte au démantèlement de l'Ukraine  Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Ven 4 Sep - 11:08

Et une couche de plus dans le genre:

Poutine: l’Ukraine gouvernée depuis l’étranger, une insulte à son peuple

L'évolution de la situation en Ukraine dépend de la patience et de la capacité des Ukrainiens à "supporter cette bacchanale", estime le président russe.

"Le fait que l'Ukraine soit gouvernée depuis l'étranger, que tous les postes clés au sein du gouvernement ainsi que dans les régions soient occupés par des étrangers est une insulte au peuple ukrainien", a déclaré le président russe Vladimir Poutine lors d'une conférence de presse organisée dans le cadre du Forum économique oriental à Vladivostok.

"Vous croyez qu'il n'y a pas de gens honnêtes et bien éduqués en Ukraine? Bien sûr que si", a-t-il ajouté.

Dans le même temps, le président russe a souligné que l'évolution de la situation en Ukraine ne dépendait pas de la Russie, mais de l'Ukraine et de son peuple.
"Cela ne dépend pas de nous, mais de l'Ukraine, de son peuple — combien de temps les Ukrainiens vont encore supporter cette bacchanale", a répondu M.Poutine à un journaliste qui l'interrogeait sur l'évolution de la situation en Ukraine.


Kiev mène depuis le 15 avril 2014 une opération militaire d'envergure en vue de réprimer la révolte qui a éclaté dans le Donbass suite au renversement du président ukrainien Viktor Ianoukovitch en février 2014. Selon un rapport de l'Onu, le conflit ukrainien a fait près de 7.000 morts et plus de 17.000 blessés. Près de 5 millions d'habitants de la région sont touchés par le conflit.

Outre la crise humanitaire, le gouvernement de Kiev est en outre confronté à une profonde crise économique.

Dans un contexte politique et socio-économique compliqué, en décembre 2014 la Rada (parlement ukrainien, ndlr) a approuvé les candidatures de citoyens étrangers, dont des citoyens des Etats-Unis, de la Géorgie ou encore de la Lituanie, à des postes ministériels.
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty UN PAVE DANS LA MARE POUR KIEV !

Message  Krispoluk le Ven 4 Sep - 17:20

Un témoignage de poids ! Et d'importance...

Saakaschvili, Gouverneur de l'Oblast d'Odessa se dit écœuré et trompé par le pouvoir, après 1,5 ans de mission au service de l'Ukraine La corruption est plus forte que jamais à Odessa...

A prendre avec des pincettes, mais cela pourrait éclairer d'un jour nouveau la réaction des blocs patriotiques à Kiev qui peuvent peut-être penser qu'ils "se font casser la gueule pour rien !" sur le front du Donbass pendant que d'autres continuent à exploiter le pays sans vergogne.
D'où l'extrême prudence à adopter face aux réactions populaires épidermiques... La "bienpensance" mondiale est prompte à condamner les groupes "fascisants" et leur dérives mais elle est bien moins prompte à déceler et dénoncer les turpitudes qui conduisent à de pareils excès ! Fin de la leçon de "morale" Wink 

D'abord l'interview de Sakaash, puis une traduc vite faite par google (excusez les fautes)

Они все время врут. Саакашвили обвинил правительство в саботаже реформ

Сегодня, 09:56    8780  12   комментировать


Et après? - Page 16 71_main
Саакашвили признал, что чувствует себя обманутым
Все решения по реформам саботируются вокруг и внутри правительства. Такое заявление сделал глава Одесской облгосадминистрации Михеил Саакашвили в эфире 5 канала.
"Я говорю о саботаже не со стороны России, которая заинтересована, чтобы по отношению ко мне был саботаж или по отношению к этому региону, потому что они хотят его "взорвать". Не со стороны каких-то местных кланов. Они распространены, но вряд ли они смогли бы мне помешать. Мы говорим о саботаже центральных правительственных учреждений", - добавил одесский губернатор.
По словам Саакашвили, украинцы все время слышат разговоры про реформы, но не видят их.
"Я здесь нахожусь 1,5 года после Майдана, я не видел больших настоящих реформ. Я видел много мимикрии насчет реформ. Я видел реформу полиции пока что, и то, мы же понимаем, что мы говорим о реформе полиции, но имеем ввиду маленькую часть служащих правопорядка, потому что все остальные такие же коррумпированные", - отметил он.
Губернатор Одесской области также подчеркнул, что решения по реформам не принимаются.
"Я слушал много раз Арсения Яценюка, он называет реформой повышение тарифов. Я называю это последствием экономического кризиса. Это последствия того, что происходит в стране. Тарифы действительно должны повышаться", - сказал Саакашвили.
Одесский чиновник также отметил, что реформы происходят тогда, когда заделываются коррупционные ямы.
"Я не только не видел заделывание коррупционных ям, на моих глазах происходит их расширение. Коррупция приобрела новые формы и, возможно, переместилась из низов на другой уровень, но она есть", - уточнил он.
Саакашвили также признал, что чувствует себя обманутым.
"Я тоже поддался на их разговоры, на их разводки. Да, я считаю себя обманутым. Они все время обманывают. Это вранье должно иметь какие-то пределы. Я сталкиваюсь с этим каждый день", - подытожил он.


Toutes les décisions sur les réformes ont été sabotées autour et au sein du gouvernement. Cette déclaration a été faite la tête de l'oléoduc Odessa Etat régional d'administration Mikheïl Saakachvili sur Channel 5.

"Je parle de sabotage ce n'est pas avec la Russie, qui est m'en veut. Pour moi le sabotage est par rapport à cette région parce qu'ils veulent la " faire exploser " non pas par certains clans locaux. Ils sont connus, mais c'est peu probable nous serions en mesure de les arrêter Nous parlons de saboter les agences du gouvernement central, "-. a déclaré le gouverneur d'Odessa.

Selon Saakachvili, les Ukrainiens entendent toujours parler de la réforme, mais ils ne les voient pas.

Je suis ici depuis 1,5 ans après Maidan, je ne l'ai pas vu beaucoup de ces réformes. J'ai vu beaucoup de poudre aux yeux sur les réformes. J'ai vécu la réforme de la police jusqu'ici, et que nous comprenons que nous parlons de la réforme de la police, mais les véritables Serviteurs de l'ordre ne sont pas là, parce que tout le monde est aussi corrompu qu'avant » - at-il dit.

Le gouverneur de la région d'Odessa a également souligné que les décisions sur les réformes ne sont pas acceptées.

" Je l'ai écouté plusieurs fois Arseni Iatseniouk, qu'il appelle la réforme des droits de douane plus élevés je l'appelle une conséquence de la crise économique Ceci est une conséquence de ce qui se passe dans le pays, les prix ayant tellement flambé" - dit Saakachvili .

"Non seulement je ne vois pas la corruption régresser dans les anciennes formes mais je vois que leur expansion a acquis de nouvelles formes et s'est peut-être déplacée du bas vers le prochain niveau, mais elle est là." - A t-il dit.

Saakachvili a également admis qu'il se sent trompé.

" J'ai moi aussi, succombé à leurs verbiage, à leurs propos ! Oui, je me sens dupé ils trichent toujours Ce mensonge devrait avoir certaines limites je fais face tous les jours», - a t-il conclu.
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Matt le Ven 4 Sep - 17:24

Si j'en juge par ce que j'ai lu sur twitter, ça semble se confirmer.  Embarassed

______________________________________________
Відвідайте Україну.
"Driven to perfection" (A. Senna)
Et après? - Page 16 Sign110
Matt
Matt
Admin

Messages : 8986
Date d'inscription : 01/01/2010
Age : 59
Localisation : Bruxelles, Belgique

http://forum-ukrainien.forumactif.org/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Thuramir le Sam 5 Sep - 11:04

Ah ! Le père Saakaschvili a enfin ouvert les yeux ! Bienvenue sur terre !
Thuramir
Thuramir

Messages : 2946
Date d'inscription : 11/07/2010
Localisation : Bruxelles

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Matt le Dim 6 Sep - 0:18

Beau coup joué par Porochenko?

Poroshenko has cleverly blocked Putin while satisfying West, Piontkovsky says

Et après? - Page 16 Putin-porosenko-minsk1

With his constitutional amendments on local self-administration, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has blocked Vladimir Putin’s plan to force Kyiv to allow Moscow-occupied regions to act as part of Ukraine, Andrey Piontkovsky says, while satisfying the needs of Kyiv’s Western allies to declare that Kyiv has fulfilled the Minsk accords.
Et après? - Page 16 4B6BE438007411

Andrey Piontkovsky, prominent Russian scientist, political writer and analyst (Image: kasparov.ru)

Those attacking Poroshenko for his position are either “sincerely misguided … or provocateurs who are trying to organize a third Maidan which is the dream of Putin and the Russian authorities,” the Russian commentator says.


Anyone who examines carefully what Poroshenko has proposed–within the limits of the options he has–will understand that his proposed constitutional changes do not legitimate the Moscow-orchestrated “DNR” and “LNR” as part of Ukraine but rather have the opposite effect, Piontkovsky says.


It is important to recognize that these constitutional changes do not mention either entity, speaking instead of “particular regions of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts.” Nor do the Minsk accords, and “such a terminological tussle” around either the constitutional changes or the Minsk texts is “in principle” more or less useless.


The Minsk agreements “will never be realized,” Piontkovsky points out, because “the Russian Federation will never fulfill their two key points: the withdrawal of foreign forces from the Donbas … and the transfer of the border to the control of Ukraine.” Given that, he says, he hopes “Ukraine will never fulfill” the Minsk agreements as Putin interprets them.


What the Kremlin wants is to insert “Lugandon” [slang term for the combined “LNR” and “DNR” entity – Ed.] like “a cancerous tumor into the political field of Ukraine,” both to force Kyiv to finance the Russian occupied regions and to allow representatives from those regions to sit in the Verkhovna Rada and sabotage Ukraine’s reforms and moves to the West.


In this situation, Poroshenko simultaneously has to avoid doing anything that threatens the territorial integrity of Ukraine as agreeing to Putin’s demands would while not doing anything that might cost Kyiv its Western allies who want to believe in the Minsk agreements which they helped to write.


“Ukraine is fighting with a superpower which has a much more powerful army than the Ukrainian one and also nuclear weapons and an enormous economic potential,” Piontkovsky says. “Ukraine cannot win this war without an alliance with the civilized world, with the EU and the US.”


France and Germany, “who were the sponsors of the Minsk agreements do not want to recognize that these accords are meaningless, except for the point concerning a cease fire.” And consequently, Poroshenko has had to find a formulation which keeps them happy without sacrificing Ukraine’s integrity.


The “worse expectations” of Poroshenko’s “radical opponents” have not been realized, the Russian analyst says. “The EU and the US did not put pressure on Kyiv to take real steps to include the occupied territories in the body of Ukraine. On the contrary, immediately after the Verkhovna Rada’s acceptance of [these] changes,” the West reacted by saying “’fine, Ukraine has fulfilled the Minsk agreements. Let’s now call on Russia to fulfill its promises.’”


“This is a diplomatic struggle,” Piontkovsky continues, “which Kyiv is conducting in a sophisticated and successful way.”


Ukrainians cannot expect the West to do everything they would like as shown by the West’s overly-restrained response to Putin’s Anschluss of Crimea, but over the past year, the West has moved in a positive pro-Ukrainian position, the Russian analyst says. And it is important that Kyiv not lose the West’s support.


Because of that Western support, Ukraine is in a far better position than it was a year ago, and Russia is in a far worse one. Moscow has stopped talking about “the Russian world” and “Novorossiya.” Instead, “Putin is thinking not about victory over Ukraine” but rather about how he can insert the “DNR” and “LNR” into Ukraine.


That in itself is a great victory for Ukraine and a reflection of the clever policy of Poroshenko, Piontkovsky adds.
Asked why he is so much more optimistic than he was earlier, the Russian analyst says that he is encouraged precisely because Putin has “lost this war” by his overreaching, his assertion that he is fighting not just Ukraine but the West, and his efforts at nuclear blackmail to get his way.


“NATO and above all the US has responded quietly to the Kremlin: ‘We understood your blackmail attempt. We will respond to it. We will defend the Baltic countries. [And] we are not afraid of your nuclear blackmail.’” And the West’s new course is “not simply words.” There are soldiers and tanks on the ground.


As a result, Moscow has changed its tune. Now, it is not talking about taking all of Ukraine and standing up to the rest of the world. Instead, it is talking now “only about the peaceful coexistence of the Russian Federation and the West, about saving ‘Putin’s face,’ and about how the master of the Kremlin will behave at the UN General Assembly.”

______________________________________________
Відвідайте Україну.
"Driven to perfection" (A. Senna)
Et après? - Page 16 Sign110
Matt
Matt
Admin

Messages : 8986
Date d'inscription : 01/01/2010
Age : 59
Localisation : Bruxelles, Belgique

http://forum-ukrainien.forumactif.org/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Matt le Dim 6 Sep - 16:59

A commencé à Kiev une réunion entre Porochenko et Christine Lagarde:

Et après? - Page 16 COOgolZWEAAAqwv

______________________________________________
Відвідайте Україну.
"Driven to perfection" (A. Senna)
Et après? - Page 16 Sign110
Matt
Matt
Admin

Messages : 8986
Date d'inscription : 01/01/2010
Age : 59
Localisation : Bruxelles, Belgique

http://forum-ukrainien.forumactif.org/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Lun 7 Sep - 13:04

Résultat de cette réunion:

L'Ukraine "a surpris le monde", selon la directrice du FMI

Et après? - Page 16 2704e33393495118b9a0c24008bb3228ef351b4e
La directrice générale du Fonds monétaire international Christine Lagarde à Ankara le 5 septembre 2015 - © ADEM ALTAN

La directrice générale du Fonds monétaire international (FMI), Christine Lagarde, a salué dimanche les réformes entreprises par l'Ukraine, qui, selon elle, "a surpris le monde", lors de sa première visite officielle dans cette ex-république soviétique.



L'Ukraine a surpris le monde


"Je suis extrêmement encouragée par les progrès réalisés ces derniers mois. (...) L'Ukraine a surpris le monde", a déclaré Mme Lagarde, lors de cette visite intervenant peu après un accord entre Kiev et ses créanciers sur la restructuration de la dette.

"Ce n'est pas le bout du chemin. Vous venez de commencer le voyage. Mener des réformes est un processus", a-t-elle cependant ajouté, lors d'une conférence de presse conjointe à Kiev avec le président ukrainien Petro Porochenko.

La semaine dernière, l'Ukraine a arraché un accord "historique" avec ses créanciers occidentaux permettant d'écarter la menace d'un défaut de paiement de ce pays ravagé par une guerre, qui a fait plus de 6800 morts depuis avril 2014, et la crise économique.

Au terme de cinq mois de difficiles négociations avec ses principaux créanciers privés, quatre fonds américains, Kiev a annoncé le 27 août un accord qui prévoit l'effacement de 20% de la dette, soit environ 3,6 milliards de dollars, et un allongement de quatre ans de la durée du remboursement de 11,5 milliards de dollars.

Engagement du FMI

Une fois achevée, la restructuration doit permettre à Kiev d'alléger ses dépenses budgétaires de 15,3 milliards de dollars sur quatre ans. Un tel effort est demandé dans le cadre du plan d'aide de 40 milliards de dollars accordé à l'Ukraine par ses alliés occidentaux et par le FMI.

L'institution internationale s'est engagée à prêter au total 17,5 milliards de dollars au pays sur quatre ans, en contrepartie de mesures drastiques visant à redresser ses finances. Plusieurs tranches ont déjà été versées.

Une nouvelle mission du FMI doit se rendre en Ukraine en septembre et ce jusqu'au 2 octobre afin d'évaluer l'évolution des réformes et la poursuite du programme d'aide, a indiqué M. Porochenko.

De son côté, le Premier ministre ukrainien, Arseni Iatseniouk, qui a également rencontré Mme Lagarde, a qualifié cette visite d'"historique".

"Pour la première fois, la directrice générale du FMI a décidé d'effectuer une visite en Ukraine, et c'est la première fois dans toute l'histoire que nous avons rempli toutes nos promesses concernant nos programmes avec le FMI", s'est-il réjoui.
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Lun 7 Sep - 13:10

Suite du message précédent :

Bon, version officielle : Lagarde qui déclare à Poro que l'Ukraine a accompli des progrès extraordinaires pour accomplir les réformes... Ouaip, ça sent bien la propagande tout ça, je sens que ça ressemble bien à un petit "coup de pouce" à Poro pour les prochaines élections à venir ! Le FMI et les bailleurs internationaux ont trop à perdre dans une aggravation politique en Ukraine et ils jouent les éléments de stabilité intérieure.

Maintenant, au vu des réactions de défiance interne qui se sont multipliées ces derniers jours, je crains pour l'avenir et la menace d'un nouveau Maïdan...

International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde arrived in Kyiv on September 6 ahead of the IMF assessment mission, saying she was impressed with the Ukrainian government’s progress made toward stabilization of the country’s economy, an UNIAN correspondent has reported 

Et après? - Page 16 1441556520-7513-lagard-reuters
REUTERS
“Ukraine has surprised the world,” said Lagarde, pleased with the pace of reforms.
“To achieve what you have achieved in such a short period of time is just nothing but astonishing,” she said.
IMF chief also noted the unique situation when both the Finance Ministry and the National Bank are headed by women.
Among the main factors that contributed to reviving the country’s economy Lagarde named restoration of the banking sector, adding that "it tells the investors to be sure that there is a team that introduces reforms, that is going to continue the transformation of the economy - economy that is open and favorable to foreign investors, that is waiting for the growth - and that the given team aims to ensure a better life and prosperity for the Ukrainian people."
As UNIAN reported earlier, Christine Lagarde came on a working visit to Kyiv on September 6, to discuss the situation in the financial and economic sector of Ukraine, and the implementation of the provisions of the second Memorandum on Economic and Financial Policies under the EFF (Extended Fund Facility) program, concluded between Ukraine and the IMF for the period of four years.
Read more on UNIAN: http://www.unian.info/economics/1119366-imf-chief-impressed-with-progress-of-economic-reforms.html
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Mar 8 Sep - 8:22

Et la Russie n'aide pas bien sûr:

La Russie et l'Ukraine loin d'un accord concernant la zone de libre-échange avec l'UE

L'Ukraine comme la Russie ont reconnu qu'il allait être difficile de trouver un arrangement d'ici la fin de l'année sur l'accord de libre-échange que Kiev a conclu avec l'Union européenne, après des discussions organisées lundi à Bruxelles sous l'égide de la Commission européenne.

Et après? - Page 16 Empty
L'Ukraine et la Russie sont encore loin de trouver un accord concernant la zone de libre-échange avec l'Union européenne (UE). Cette zone de libre-échange, entre l'Ukraine et l'UE, que la Russie considère comme une menace pour son économie, et qui va lever une grande majorité de leurs barrières douanières, doit entrer en vigueur le 1er janvier 2016. C'est le principal volet de l'accord d'association déjà appliqué entre l'UE et l'Ukraine, que la Russie voit comme un empiètement des Européens dans sa sphère d'influence.
 
L'annulation sous la pression russe de la signature de cet accord initialement prévue à l'automne 2013 avait été le déclencheur des manifestations pro-européennes qui ont mené à la chute du gouvernement de Viktor Ianoukovitch. La Russie avait alors annexé la Crimée en mars 2014 et un conflit meurtrier s'était déclenché dans l'est de l'Ukraine avec des rebelles prorusses, que les Occidentaux accusent Moscou de soutenir.
 
Interrogé sur les chances d'arriver à un compromis sur la zone de libre-échange d'ici à la fin de l'année, le ministre de l'Economie russe Alexeï Oulioukaïev a jugé qu'elles n'étaient "pas très élevées", à l'issue d'une réunion avec le chef de la diplomatie ukrainienne Pavlo Klimkine et la commissaire européenne au Commerce Cecilia Malmström.
 
La Russie menace l'Ukraine de restrictions commerciales
 
"Nous n'avons reçu aucune preuve étayant les inquiétudes des Russes", a affirmé M. Klimkine. "Le 1er janvier est la date ultime, la date finale", a-t-il martelé alors que Moscou demande que l'entrée en vigueur de la zone de libre-échange soit repoussée. "C'est une décision conjointe entre la Commission et l'Ukraine", a insisté le ministre ukrainien. 
 
M. Oulioukaïev a pour sa part averti que la Russie imposerait des restrictions commerciales à l'Ukraine si la zone de libre-échange démarrait au 1er janvier, menaçant en particulier d'étendre à l'Ukraine l'embargo agroalimentaire qui s'applique déjà à l'UE. Un ensemble de mesures dont le coût est estimé pour l'Ukraine à 1,5 milliard d'euros par an. Moscou estime pour sa part le préjudice pour son économie à environ 100 milliards de roubles par an, soit 1,3 milliard d'euros au cours actuel.
 
Mme Malmström a seulement annoncé que les participants avaient "réaffirmé leur volonté de trouver des arrangements pratiques", dans un communiqué. Des échanges pour rédiger un document commun auront lieu en octobre en vue d'une nouvelle réunion au niveau ministériel en novembre.


Et après? - Page 16 92884FD6-82E5-4DDA-9EEF-7FB7518262CB_w640_r1_s_cx0_cy15_cw01
VOA's Myroslava Gongadze speaks with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko in Kyiv, Ukraine, September 4, 2015 (Image: VOA) 
President Petro Poroshenko said in a Voice of America interview on Friday that Russia should lose its veto power in the UN Security Council because of its aggressive actions against Ukraine, arguing that the world would be a safer place if Moscow could not veto resolutions it doesn’t like.

At the same time, Poroshenko, whose government has just modified its national security doctrine to identify Russia as an enemy and to declare Kyiv’s intention of seeking NATO membership, said that Russia as a major power should retain its permanent seat on that body.

The Ukrainian leader said that “the world has a right to know who’s responsible for [the] disastrous terrorist attack” on the Malaysian airliner in July 2014 and that “if only one country, especially Russia as a permanent UN Security Council member uses its veto” to block the investigation, “this is self-explanatory.”

Poroshenko added that “with its aggression in eastern Ukraine and Crimea,” “Russia ruined the post-World War II global security system,” and that aggression must be repelled and the conditions which have allowed Russia to engage in it must be identified and overcome by the international community.

Many in both Moscow and the West will dismiss Poroshenko’s proposal out of hand either because they are convinced that none of the other permanent members of the UN Security Council will agree or because they believe that raising this issue now will only make the current situation more explosive.

But that is a mistake: it has been 70 years since the post-World War II “global security system” was established, and Poroshenko is absolutely right to say that Russia and its aggressive actions have not so much called that system into question as shattered it. Consequently, the world needs to begin thinking about organizational changes for the future.

Depriving aggressors of their veto power in the Security Council is likely to be an important part of the debate: at the very least, it should be discussed.

The current author raised this possibility in his Lennart Meri lecture in April 2015 and provided what he believes is the reason it must be considered in an article for a special issue of Estonia’s “Diplomaatia” journal titled “Responding To The New Russian Challenge.”

The relevant passage of that article follows:
“There is no possibility that the world can return to the status quo ante, even if Putin backs down everywhere—something he will not do or, even if he is overthrown, something which no one can count on. The current international order and all its institutions were created at the end or immediately after World War II. These institutions reflected both the power relations, military and economic, that existed at the time and, equally, expectations about what the allies of the end of that conflict would do in the future.

“Those power relations have shifted, and the expectations have not been fulfilled. But now, by his actions in Ukraine, Putin has made a return to the old order impossible, however much those in the quest for “stabil’nost’ über alles” may think otherwise. There needs to be an international organisation in which no rogue state can veto any judgement against itself, no matter how many nuclear weapons it may possess. There need to be political and financial arrangements that reflect the shifting balance in the world between the US, Europe and Asia. And all of those things will require new organisations and a new generation of wise men—and now wise women, as well.

“Putin and Russia must pay a price for what the Kremlin has done, and that price will not be paid just by having them stop doing it. The world needs to remember the 1957 Krokodil cartoon in which a student complains that he has been given a failing grade even though he has admitted all his mistakes. The way ahead is going to be far more difficult than almost anyone now imagines. But the longer these intellectual and political tasks are put off, the more damage Putin will do, and the harder it will be for the West to defend its values and itself in the future.”
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Jeu 10 Sep - 10:44

L'Ukraine restera unitaire après la décentralisation, selon le président

Le président ukrainien Petro Porochenko a affirmé mercredi que son pays restera un ''Etat unitaire'' après la réforme de la décentralisation, qui donnera davantage d'autonomie à certaines régions. 
 
Lors d'une réunion du Conseil du développement régional, M. Porochenko a souligné que le modèle de décentralisation de l'Ukraine ne fédéralisera pas le pays, car la réforme ne transférera davantage de pouvoirs aux autorités régionales que pour l'économie locale et l'appareil administratif, alors que les questions relatives à la défense, à la politique étrangère et à la sécurité nationale resteront sous le contrôle de Kiev. 
 
Par ailleurs, M. Porochenko a indiqué que l'initiative de décentralisation de l'Ukraine, l'une des principales dispositions de l'accord de cessez-le-feu de Minsk négocié pour mettre un terme au conflit dans les régions orientales, est un compromis ayant pour objet de servir les intérêts de l'ensemble des régions ukrainiennes et de veiller à ce que le pays reste uni. 
 
La semaine dernière, le parlement ukrainien a adopté en première lecture le projet de loi sur les amendements constitutionnels en vue de la décentralisation, qui devrait donner davantage d'autonomie aux régions de Donetsk et de Lougansk, à l'est du pays, dans le cadre du plan de paix de Minsk. 
 
La décision du parlement a provoqué la controverse en Ukraine car certaines forces politiques ont invoqué qu'elle pourrait diviser le pays. 
 
La décision a également déclenché de violents affrontements entre la police et des membres de partis politiques nationalistes, qui ont fait trois morts et plus de cent blessés.

A propos des déclarations de Saakachvili:

En Ukraine, la guerre des mots entre Saakachvili et Iatseniouk

Et après? - Page 16 2013-06-09T000850Z_10373808_GM1E9690ML901_RTRMADP_3_AFGHANISTAN-GEORGIA_0

Nouvelle saga politique en Ukraine. Mikheïl Saakachvili, ancien président de Géorgie et actuel gouverneur d’Odessa, entre en opposition frontale avec le Premier ministre urkrainien, Arseni Iatseniouk. Ce dernier est accusé d’entraver les réformes, d’encourager la corruption, et de servir les intérêts des oligarques. Tout un programme.

De notre correspondant à Kiev,

Le gouvernement central saboterait tout le travail que Mikheïl Saakachvili entreprend dans la région d’Odessa, accuse ce dernier. Le Premier ministre Arseni Iatseniouk freinerait la réforme de la justice, il torpillerait le nettoyage des douanes, il empêcherait de construire des routes et il détournerait même les routes de contrebande internationale à son profit.

Comme on peut s’y attendre, le Premier ministre dément catégoriquement ces accusations. Il vient juste d’être sacré par Christine Lagarde, la directrice du FMI, comme un réformateur intègre et audacieux, et il y tient. Arseni Iatseniouk affirme que Mikheïl Saakachvili est lui sont « dans le même bateau », et que le gouverneur ne s’exprime que sous le coup de l’émotion, une critique facile contre un ancien président géorgien que l’on sait très impulsif. Pour l’instant, on en est à une guerre des mots, mais c’est bien une guerre.

Les raisons de ces accusations

Cela fait un peu plus de trois mois, donc 100 jours, que Mikheïl Saakachvili a été nommé gouverneur par le président Petro Porochenko. C’est l’heure de tirer un premier bilan. Mais plus généralement, Mikheïl Saakachvili alimente une critique généralisée en Ukraine. Il avait changé radicalement la Géorgie, il considère que les réformes d’Arseni Iatseniouk ne sont pas des vraies réformes.


Et après? - Page 16 2014-05-13T144727Z_1440209308_GM1EA5D1Q8601_RTRMADP_3_UKRAINE-CRISIS-EU_0
Le Premier ministre ukrainien Arseni Iatseniouk affirme que Mikheïl Saakachvili est lui sont « dans le même bateau », et que le gouverneur ne s’exprime que sous le coup de l’émotion.REUTERS/François Lenoir


La guerre ouverte entre les deux hommes coïncide avec le lancement, le 1er septembre, d’une pétition à l’attention de Petro Porochenko, afin de lui demander de nommer Mikheïl Saakachvili Premier ministre. Il fallait 25 000 signatures pour que cette pétition soit légalement validée : ce mercredi matin, elle en avait déjà recueilli plus de 29 000. Mikheïl Saakachvili a les faveurs de l’opinion publique, mais il a répété plusieurs fois qu’il ne visait pas le poste de Premier ministre. Mais il a publiquement appelé à une refonte du gouvernement à Kiev, insistant sur le fait que l’équipe actuelle ne fonctionne pas !

Le silence du président Petro Porochenko

Pour l’instant, c'est le silence radio du côté de la présidence. Mais, on sait Petro Porochenko très proche de Mikheïl Saakachvili, alors que la cohabitation avec le Premier ministre est un calvaire. Les critiques de Mikheïl Saakachvili sont donc sans doute l’écho des contrariétés de la présidence.

D’autant que pour l’instant, Mikheïl Saakachvili est très pratique pour Petro Porochenko, par exemple pour lutter contre certains oligarques, comme le sulfureux Ihor Kolomoïsky, sans déclencher un affrontement frontal. Ihor Kolomoïsky consacre de fait ses charges contre Mikheïl Saakachvili , et épargne un peu le président ukrainien. L’oligarque a récemment comparé le gouverneur à un « chien qui aboie, un petit chien qu’il faudrait raccompagner dans sa Géorgie natale avec récompense pour celui qui l’aura trouvé. » En Ukraine, il y a beaucoup de choses qui changent mais les querelles politiciennes sont toujours controversées et colorées qu'auparavant. Là-dessus, c’est sûr, rien n’a changé depuis la Révolution de la Dignité.
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 10 Sep - 11:01

Ouaip, article très intéressant, on avait déjà commencé à en discuter...
Venant de Kiev, tout est beau, les réformes avancent à grands pas Question Question Question  Mais il y a quand même des signes de mécontentement. La manif se Sabotomitch qui a dégénéré, Saakash qui "casse la baraque" de l'intérieur...
Thuramir avait déjà levé un lièvre en nous apprenant que les nouveaux flics (et fliquettes) jeunes, dynamiques, formés à l'américaine et "incorruptibles" d'Odessa étaient en fait les cousins/nièces/enfants/voisins de flics en place précédemment... Alors la "lutte anti-corruption" et la "lustration" : simple "ravalement de façade" politique pour paraître "plus blanc" ? Ou avance-t-on réellement ???

Ce qui est certain c'est que ces remous doivent servir la propagande du Guébiste qui peut proclamer : "En Ukraine, c'est la chienlit alors que chez nous, l'Ordre règne..." Et pour cause ! Dans toutes les dictatures du monde il règne un ordre imperturbable, voyez la Corée du Nord, la Tchétchénie et la Russie Twisted Evil
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Jeu 10 Sep - 11:10

C'est une guerre d'influence . . . non?
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 10 Sep - 11:19

Александр a écrit:C'est une guerre d'influence . . . non?

Je ne comprend pas très bien le sens de ta question, donc je l'interprète à ma façon...

Je crois que Poro, même s'il n'est pas lui même l'instigateur de la fronde de Saakash, ce qui n'est pas prouvé  Evil or Very Mad  Veut provoquer un débat interne et c'est bien entendu Yatseniouk qui est visé. En Ukraine comme en France, le Premier Ministre est le "fusible" du président qui doit sauter avant que l'incendie ne mette le feu à toute la baraque...
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Jeu 10 Sep - 12:13

C'était, aussi, le sens de ma pensée.
Mais de là à le faire sauter, je ne pense pas.
Ne pas oublier leur rôle respectif lots de Maïdan, Arseny était (bien) plus présent que Porochenko.
Le virer serait s'attirer les foudres de pas mal d'ukrainiens (je crois).
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Matt le Jeu 10 Sep - 18:07

La dernière de Lavrov:
Le Donbass doit respecter les lois de l'Ukraine lors des élections locales, mais sans les "radicaux":

"ДНР" и "ЛНР" готовы к проведению выборов по украинским законам, но "без участия "ПС" и прочих радикалов", - Лавров

C'est comme si la Russie disait à la Grèce d'organiser des élections sans "ombre dorée" ou à la France sans le FN (flûte, ils ont des mairies), à la Belgique sans la NVA (reflûte, ils sont au gouvernement), à la Hongrie sans Viktor Orban (re-reflûte, il est président) . . .  Evil or Very Mad

______________________________________________
Відвідайте Україну.
"Driven to perfection" (A. Senna)
Et après? - Page 16 Sign110
Matt
Matt
Admin

Messages : 8986
Date d'inscription : 01/01/2010
Age : 59
Localisation : Bruxelles, Belgique

http://forum-ukrainien.forumactif.org/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 10 Sep - 18:37

Matt a écrit:La dernière de Lavrov:
Le Donbass doit respecter les lois de l'Ukraine lors des élections locales, mais sans les "radicaux":

"ДНР" и "ЛНР" готовы к проведению выборов по украинским законам, но "без участия "ПС" и прочих радикалов", - Лавров

C'est comme si la Russie disait à la Grèce d'organiser des élections sans "ombre dorée" ou à la France sans le FN (flûte, ils ont des mairies), à la Belgique sans la NVA (reflûte, ils sont au gouvernement), à la Hongrie sans Viktor Orban (re-reflûte, il est président) . . .  Evil or Very Mad

Euh ! Un peu aventureuse ta comparaison camarade !!! Même très aventureuse... Enfin, chacun analyse ça à sa façon hein !
Krispoluk
Krispoluk

Messages : 7115
Date d'inscription : 03/06/2014
Localisation : Chez les Ch'tis

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Matt le Jeu 10 Sep - 20:59

Comme lui, je fais un peu de provocation. Na!!   Twisted Evil  Wink  Laughing

______________________________________________
Відвідайте Україну.
"Driven to perfection" (A. Senna)
Et après? - Page 16 Sign110
Matt
Matt
Admin

Messages : 8986
Date d'inscription : 01/01/2010
Age : 59
Localisation : Bruxelles, Belgique

http://forum-ukrainien.forumactif.org/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Thuramir le Jeu 10 Sep - 22:55

Matt a écrit:
C'est comme si la Russie disait à la Grèce d'organiser des élections sans "ombre dorée" ou à la France sans le FN (flûte, ils ont des mairies), à la Belgique sans la NVA (reflûte, ils sont au gouvernement), à la Hongrie sans Viktor Orban (re-reflûte, il est président) . . .  Evil or Very Mad

Non, non ! Orban est le premier ministre, pas le président.  Very Happy
Thuramir
Thuramir

Messages : 2946
Date d'inscription : 11/07/2010
Localisation : Bruxelles

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Александр le Ven 11 Sep - 7:45

Il dirait: "mea culpa". Laughing  Wink
Александр
Александр

Messages : 5390
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2010
Localisation : Leuven, België

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Et après? - Page 16 Empty Re: Et après?

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 16 sur 40 Précédent  1 ... 9 ... 15, 16, 17 ... 28 ... 40  Suivant

Revenir en haut


 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum