Et en Russie !

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Matt le Ven 3 Juin - 16:56

Rien à ajouter, la bonne comédie russe.

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  benoit77 le Ven 3 Juin - 17:22

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Matt le Ven 3 Juin - 17:26

Mais n'y arrive pas . . .  Very Happy

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  benoit77 le Sam 4 Juin - 14:47

Lavrov :
Alors quand nos dépités (d'occident) votent pour la reconnaissance des génocides des ukrainiens ou des tatars, ils sont des cons qui ne comprennent rien à l'histoire et sont aux ordres des nazis-sionistes-ricains.
Mais quand les dépités reconnaissent le génocide des arméniens, là nos élus sont indépendant !!
http://fr.apa.az/xeber_lavrov_explique_les_raisons_de_la_reconn_27449.html

La parole de merde Lavrov est à géométrie variable. en plus , c'est pratique , ça fait chier les turcs !
Surtout à quelques jours d' un vote sur la prolongation des sanctions.
Faut bien amadouer les dépités pour avoir un vote favorable !

Encore une autre de lavrov pour faire le gentil au yeux du monde:
Il y a encore quelques jours une mission OSCE à la "frontière" du dombass et des observateurs dans la zone des zozos , c'était hors de questions.
Mais à cause du vote qui se rapproche , il fait croire que c'est possible :
http://news.liga.net/news/politics/11026241-lavrov_rossiya_gotova_soglasitsya_na_vooruzhenie_nablyudateley_obse.htm

à noter que "frontière" pour Lavrov c'est juste la ligne de démarcation alors que dans les accords de Minsk c'est la vrai (russo-ukrainienne).
Mais bon quand une parole de merde comme lui , on est pas à une saloperie!


La "réponse" de Merkel:
http://news.liga.net/news/politics/11026255-merkel_es_gotov_otmenit_sanktsii_esli_rf_vypolnit_minsk.htm
traduction : "Lavrov , tu nous prends pour des cons ?"
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Lun 6 Juin - 8:08

Réponse: Oui Exclamation Twisted Evil
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Mar 7 Juin - 8:27

Kremlin official: Moscow can’t sit by when ethnic Russians are “oppressed and persecuted” in former Soviet republics


Valentina Matviyenko, Speaker of Russia's Federation Council (Image: nahnews.org) 

Speaking in Russian-occupied Crimea, Federation Council Speaker Valentina Matviyenko on Friday gave the clearest sign yet that the Kremlin plans to expand its efforts to mobilize Russians and Russian speakers in the former Soviet republics and Baltic states, people she says are loyal to their new countries but remain Russian compatriots.

Russia does not want any longer to “sit quietly by and watch” as ethnic Russians and Russian speakers “in certain former republics of the USSR” are subject to become objects of “oppression and persecution” regarding their education and language rights, she insists.


Matviyenko says that “one can offer a mass of example of discrimination” against them, adding that “we know what is going on in this sphere in Latvia, Estonia and Ukraine,” as well as “in a number of other countries” including Belarus and Moldova. All this is unacceptable, and “Russia has supported and will support its foreign compatriots.”



According to the Federation Council head, “Russian compatriots beyond the borders of Russia wherever they live must have the opportunity to preserve their ties with their historical motherland, to study Russian language and culture, and to feel themselves to be Russian [‘russkiye’] people.”



Devastation in the Donbas – the product of Putin’s military aggression into peaceful Ukraine. (Image: Slavyansk Delovoy)

She adds that “in certain countries,” governments and others are whipping up Russophobia and undertaking efforts to “isolate their citizens from the great Russian culture” under the pretext that the bearers of that culture are supposedly disloyal to the countries in which they live.

“If one calls things by their right names, this policy is unworthy,” Matviyenko says. “There are large numbers of Russians in Ukraine, in Belarus, Moldova and the Baltic countries… No one has ever produced facts or examples of their disloyalty or their support of the political and economic interests of Russia to the harm of the interests of the countries where they live.”

Matviyenko’s statement is breathtaking in its flight from reality – she speaks of “the former republics of the USSR” rather than the more normal locution “the republics of the former USSR,” for example – but perhaps the most damning part of her remarks is that they took place in Crimea, a part of Ukraine that Moscow invaded militarily in the name of helping Russians against Kyiv.


Trucks with the “little green men” – Russian soldiers hiding their identities and without insignia while annexing the Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea

Ils veulent vraiment se justifier, mais n'y arrivent pas . . .
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Matt le Mar 7 Juin - 18:22

In Putin’s Russia, History Is Subversive


Putin is re-writing the past to justify authoritarianism in the present.
Over the past two years, as the Kremlin has annexed Crimea, waged a war of aggression against Ukraine, intervened in Syria, and otherwise threatened Euro-Atlantic security, the situation inside Russia has deteriorated. President Vladimir Putin’s authoritarianism has intensified.

Putin’s reputation as a champion against a supposedly predatory West has solidified among the public. Aided by an atmosphere of intolerance that enjoys unspoken Kremlin support, authorities have cracked down on civil liberties. Political opposition figures have been poisoned and killed. As anti-Westernism has become widespread and authorities have argued in favor of returning to “traditional values” at a time of worsening economic conditions, Putin has consolidated society around his regime—critical voices are now treated like enemies of the state. In doing so, he has revived the tradition of using history as a political weapon.


Putin has, to be sure, used history throughout his 16 years in power as a means of self-assertion, preserving the current political system, and legitimizing the Kremlin’s actions. But his recent manipulation of history poses a growing challenge for the West, since it helps to sustain the Kremlin’s confrontational foreign policy and fuel anti-Western sentiments within Russian society.

The controversy surrounding Sergei Mironenko, the long-time Director of the Russian State Archive, is a case in point. Last July, the State Archive published formerly classified correspondence between top Soviet officials from 1948. The correspondence deeply undermined the popular Soviet legend of “Panfilov’s 28 Guardsmen”—the Red Army’s 316th Rifle Division, led by Major General Ivan Panfilov, who were said to have died while repelling a Nazi attack on the outskirts of Moscow in the winter of 1941. The soldiers were decorated posthumously: They each received the title “Hero of the USSR,” had streets and monuments dedicated to them, and were immortalized in Moscow’s city anthem. A film about them—funded by crowd-sourcing and backed by Russia’s Ministry of Culture—is due to premiere in Russia in November.

The correspondence published by the State Archive, however, showed that a war journalist had invented the story. Moreover,Soviet authorities had uncovered the fiction, but buried the evidence for reasons of political expediency. Not only had some of the supposedly-deceased men actually survived the attack, one of them—Ivan Dobrobabin—had surrendered to the Nazis and was later arrested by Soviet authorities for “betrayal of the motherland.”

Since becoming President in 2000, Putin has cultivated a conservatism in which the Soviet victory over the Nazis is of central ideological importance. As the reality of the Soviet past has receded into history, however, myth has taken its place—a substitution encouraged by Russian authorities. By far the most pervasive is the myth that the Soviet Union was solely responsible for defeating Nazism and defending Europe. Because the Soviet Union was on both sides during World War II, the Kremlin bristles at any attempts to question its black-and-white narrative. And because Putin is so closely associated with World War II, any questioning of the narrative is seen as a direct threat to him and his hold on power.

In the fallout that followed the revelation, Vladimir Medinsky, Russia’s Culture Minister, criticized Mironenko for publishing the correspondence. The head archivist, Medinsky said, is “not a writer, not a journalist, not a fighter against historical falsifications … If he wants to change profession, we will understand this.” The state-backed makers of the Panfilov film, meanwhile, dismissed the correspondence as an attempt to “undermine this heroic feat.”

In March, Mironenko was dismissed from his position. Officially, this was the result of a “collective decision” by authorities. Mironenko’s colleagues, however, told the Russian daily newspaper Moskovsky Komsomolets that they believe he fell victim to a new official approach to history, of which Medinsky is the chief advocate. According to Medinsky, who is author of the book War: Myths of the USSR (published in 2013), history begins “not with facts but with interpretations.”

The Kremlin’s warped interpretation of history not only seeks to consolidate Russian society around an idealized past, but also to legitimize Russia’s aggressive foreign policy in a mythologized present.

Earlier this year, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov wrote an article entitled “Russia’s Foreign Policy in a Historical Perspective” for the journal Russia in Global Affairs. The piece, which was published as the Kremlin basked in the success of its military operations in Syria, outlines a sweeping, paranoid version of Russia’s history from the adoption of Christianity in Russia in 988 and Rus’ survival of the Tatar-Mongol Yoke through to the Napoleonic Wars and the Cold War.

Throughout Russia’s history, Lavrov argued, Western Europe has always been biased against Moscow, seeking to isolate and victimize it. This is one of Putin’s favorite tropes. And Lavrov’s piece is replete with others: World War II started because of “the anti-Russian aspirations of the European elites”; the Cold War ended because an “unlucky chain of events” led to the dissolution of the USSR; those countries in Central and Eastern Europe that have joined the European Union and NATO since 1991 “can’t take any significant decision without the green light from Washington or Brussels.”

In spite of Europe’s conniving, however, Russia has always sought to play a constructive role in uniting the continent, reducing the possibility of conflict and war, and establishing international bodies to ensure peace and order. And without Russia, went Lavrov’s argument, Europe can only be exposed to chaos. “During the last two centuries,” he writes, “any attempt to unite Europe without Russia and against it has inevitably led to grim tragedies.”

This is not a new Russian message. But it is a message that Russia is keen to insert into mainstream European thought. In February, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev made that clear while attending the annual Munich Security Conference. Medvedev may have made headlines with his talk of a new “Cold War” and his warning of the dangers of a “third global tragedy”—but just as significantly, he called for a revision of the “architecture of Euro-Atlantic security.”

Lavrov’s article, as mirrored by the sacking of Mironenko, reveals Putin’s desire to control Russia’s history.

Just as Mironenko’s document encourages Russian citizens to question official narratives surrounding World War II, Lavrov’s essay attempts to foreclose any subversion: his is a fundamental re-writing of more than a millennium that casts Russia as an innocent victim of global events. For Putin, what history teaches is that Russia’s enemies are tirelessly plotting to undermine the country, both from within and without. Controlling how history is remembered, thus, is more than an instrument to consolidate the nation. It is also a way to prepare Russians for war. And to keep them in a state of war readiness.

Having brought Russia’s media and politics to heel, the Kremlin has paved a path for the state to revise and re-write history. The state, in Putin’s eyes, is the sole caretaker of national memory. Leading up to the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II, the Kremlin convened a Historical Truth Commission to combat the “falsification of history.” In 2014, Russia criminalized the rehabilitation of Nazism, including any activities that criticized the actions of the Soviet Union between 1939 and 1945. Last year, Putin initiated the unification of Russian history textbooks with the aim of creating a standard version of national history. With these developments, Russia is establishing a historical canon—a state-approved version of history.

Russia is not unique, of course, in seeing its history politicized. Nor is it unique in having a different understanding of history than its neighbors. What is special about Russia, however, is the extent to which anything is possible in the service of propaganda.

Take the state’s attempts to obtain a monopoly on the knowledge of history, which are visible in the Kremlin’s accusations regarding the “falsification” of history. By “falsification” the Kremlin means anything that is contrary to what it is saying today, because what it said yesterday and what it may say tomorrow are likely to be different. Also take the state’s attempts to control the interpretation of history, which means not only that the Kremlin disregards existing interpretations of history but also that it creates its own.

Faced with this situation, there are a number of practical steps the West could take to counter Putin’s use of history. Educational programs are needed inside of Russia that clearly distinguish between recognizing Russia and the Soviet Union’s role in history on the one hand, and rejecting Russia’s manipulation of history on the other. Russia’s attempts to “monopolize” the Soviet victory in World War II, and therefore to deprive other former Soviet states of this legacy, should also be rejected. The West should support research in the Russian and Soviet archives. Some historical materials located inside of Russia are not accessible, but others in the former Soviet states are.

Within Russia, few openly question the Kremlin’s official version of events. Instead, most take the Kremlin’s manipulation of history at face value, and, if left unchecked, this is only likely to have negative long-term consequences. As the Kremlin becomes increasingly authoritarian domestically and adopts a confrontational attitude towards its immediate neighbors and the West, Russia’s citizens will likely support this—safe in the knowledge that Russia’s history justifies Moscow’s actions.


Andrew Foxall is director of the Russia Studies Centre at The Henry Jackson Society, a London-based international affairs think-tank.

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Thuramir le Mar 7 Juin - 21:40

Александр a écrit:La dégringolade continue son chemin:


Cotation Pétrole Brent







Cours Ice Europ31.06 USD
Variation0.81%
Dernier échange10/02/16 09:27:10
Volume19 380
Ouverture30.95
+ Haut31.14
+ Bas30.75
+ Haut 12 derniers mois38.99
+ Bas 12 derniers mois27.10
Clôture veille30.81


Conversion EURO/ROUBLE RUSSIE







Cours Six - Forex 189.0008
Variation-0.84%
Ouverture89.7221
+ Haut89.9165
+ Bas88.8369
Clôture veille89.7515

On a un peu perdu de vue cet aspect de la situation (février 2016 --> juin 2016) !

  • mardi 7 juin 2016 21:28


  • Le Cours du baril de pétrole en dollars: 50.49 $ (+0.80 1.61% )


        Le Cours du pétrole Brent en dollars: 51.52 $ (+0.97 1.92% )





  • [size=11]EUR/RUB close:73.40805 low:73.40543 high:74.19662[/size]


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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Krispoluk le Mar 7 Juin - 22:25

Les analystes sont partagés sur cette remontée des cours du brut : remontée durable ou temporaire ?

A titre personnel, mais c'est juste une impression, je pense qu'elle est temporaire. Pourquoi ?

- L'Iran est revenu sur le marché export avec la levée des sanctions et l'Iran a un besoin urgent de "flouze". Idem pour la Russie et d'autres états secondaires : Venezuela, Nigéria.
- l'Arabie Séoudite qui est à l'origine de la baisse du brut n'est pas prête à lâcher du lest car elle favoriserait ainsi l'Iran, son ennemi religieux absolu. Un nouveau ministre du "pétrole" a été nommé en Arabie et il est favorable à la politique d'un prix bas.
-Des concurrents sérieux sont apparus avec la technologie d'extraction du gaz de schiste, USA, Canada et même Australie, donc, l'offre prend encore le pas sur la demande, surtout avec le ralentissement de la croissance chinoise.

Donc, il est probable que le prix du brut varie entre 40$ et 50$ d'ici la fin de l'année mais je ne lis pas dans une boule de cristal, juste une supputation...


Dernière édition par Krispoluk le Mar 7 Juin - 23:20, édité 1 fois
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Matt le Mar 7 Juin - 22:41

J'ai vu sur twitter (?) que l'Arabie Saoudite allait encore augmenter sa production et par conséquent, le prix va de nouveau baisser.
Remarque, ces bas prix ne se retrouve pas au prix à la pompe.
Ce week end, j'ai été en France. L'horreur pour y faire son plein. Presque 1.5€ le littre de 95, chez nous c'est 1.25.

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Thuramir le Mar 7 Juin - 23:36

Difficile à prévoir le prix du pétrole ! Il n'est pas lié uniquement à la production, mais aussi à la consommation, aux prix exigé par les pays producteurs, à des effets psychologiques chez les acteurs du marché financier international, etc.

Quant au prix à la pompe, il n'y a qu'un seul gagnant : l'Etat. Quand le prix baisse trop, il peut augmenter les accises et se faire encore plus d'argent. De là, le fait que le prix à la pompe ne représente pas fidèlement celui du cours.
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Mer 8 Juin - 9:08

Reuters: Russia deploys troops westward as standoff with NATO deepens
Principalement en Belgique avec le système "à cliquet" servant aux taxes. Twisted Evil

Autre chose:

Cardin Remarks at Russian Violation of Borders, Treaties and Human Rights Hearing

Tuesday, June 7, 2016 
            
WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, offered the following opening statement, as prepared for delivery, at a Committee hearing Tuesday on ‘Russian violations of Borders, Treaties and Human Rights’: 

“Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for calling this important and timely hearing. 

“Today we meet to discuss Russian efforts to undermine institutions that have maintained peace and security in Europe since the end of the Cold War. Russia's actions in Georgia in 2008, support for separatist enclaves in Georgia and Moldova, invasion of Ukraine, illegal annexation of Crimea, and ongoing support for combined Russian-separatist forces in eastern Ukraine have challenged the inviolability of sovereign borders, something that has been the mainstay of relations in Europe since the signing of the Helsinki Accords in 1975. 

“And we have serious concerns about Russia's compliance with seminal arms control treaties. While I understand that Russia complies with treaties like New START, it is in violation of others like the INF, and there are compliance issues with the Open Skies Treaty. I am concerned about these violations and look forward to hearing how we can strengthen our ability to verify and enforce their terms.  There are legitimate questions about the value of such accords as Russia wantonly disregards its international commitments across the board.  However, this should not lead us to the conclusion that all arms control agreements should be ripped up. While not perfect, these agreements afford us some visibility into Russian intentions.  I also want to underscore the importance of these treaties to our allies, especially Open Skies. As we seek to bolster European unity in the face of Russian aggression, pulling out of Open Skies would send the wrong message to our friends. 

“What is often lost in the debate about Russia's negative behavior abroad is how it treats its own people at home. 

“Last year's horrific murder of Boris Nemtsov, just steps from the Kremlin, is the most sobering example of the danger facing the opposition. Today we are honored to be joined by Vladimir Kara-Murza, a prominent member of the political opposition who was poisoned in Moscow under suspicious circumstances and spent months in a coma. Vladimir, thank you for your courage and all that you do for the people of the Russian Federation. 

“New laws targeting "foreign agents" and "undesirables organizations", which label NGOs as traitors of the Russian state, have impeded the work of NDI, OSF, and the MacArthur Foundation. Golos, the Russian organization that has monitored every election since the fall of the Soviet Union has come under harassment and is in danger of having to close its doors as well. 

“Putin has fueled corruption by weakening the rule of law and his cronies know that their fortunes depend on access and allegiance to the regime. And those who make public these corrupt acts are threatened, abused, or worse. Sergei Magnitsky was one of them - and he paid the ultimate price for his honesty. 

“As everyone here knows, the Magnitsky law targets human rights abusers inside Russia. While 40 people have been sanctioned since 2012, I call on the administration to hold accountable more human rights abusers in the country.  As human rights violations increase, so should our response. 

“In summary, Russia under Putin is a kleptocratic regime intent on undermining democracy at home and abroad. We will have shared interests with the Russian regime but can never forget our principles or turn a blind eye to human rights violations committed by Putin. 

“Mr. Chairman, thank you again for convening this hearing and I look forward to the discussion with our witnesses.” 

The Thief Next Door: Russia's rich history of annexing neighbouring countries


Finland, Typical fishing warehouses with wooden coloured walls, at the time of the midnight sun, on Eckero, one of the islands of Aland, an archipeago in Finland (Getty Images)

Decades later Moscow's invasion still an open wound in Finland  
       

Finland... the thought of Vladimir Putin doesn't quite come to mind at the first mention of it. But, a small Finnish autonomy, the Aland islands is living under the vast shadow of the Kremlin.

The trip begins at a central bus station. Although it may sound warm and exotic the actual climate here is damp and cold. Aland - nearly seven thousand rocky islands, a region that encompasses an archipelago at the entrance of the Gulf of Bothnia in the Baltic Sea.

Just like Ukraine's Crimea, Aland is an autonomous region and although nowadays it is the only Swedish-speaking region in Finland...

Aland islands were under the rule of the Russian Empire. And seemingly, Russia's interest in the Finnish autonomy has not faded yet.


So what's it like for the Finns to live right beside a neighbour that stole a part of their land? From a Ukrainian standpoint that sounds way-too-familiar.

The Kremlin grip on the neighbouring ex-Soviet states is evident, but it's not that easy to spot in Finland, at least not with a naked eye.

The phenomena of cross-border shopping. It is a part of the Finland/Russia frontier too. The Russian language can be heard everywhere here. Special buses bring shoppers here several times a day.


Russians buy everything from coffee to household supplies. "We don't have anything tasty, everything in Russia is bad. Everything is a knock-off, a fake, we don't know what's what, there's saturated fat in everything".

The retailers have learned to deal with the influx of buyers from Russia. Nearly all of the groceries here are close to their expiration date. Fins would never buy it but Russians do. "I like seafood.

Octopus especially. Not that we don't have it, it's just more expensive. And, we don't have octopus, but my kids love it and husband too, and all sorts of different calamari."

Even the sales woman is Russian here, from Vyborg, a town that used to be Finland. Now in modern-day Russia she couldn't find a job so came to Finland.

A: Nobody took Crimea away - they voted!


Q: So tell me you're from Vyborg, it used to be Finland. Do you think people would want it to be Finland again?



A: Now, the Finns will not want it back



The border between the two countries seems to be getting closer and closer. There are more busses full of Russians, gas stations with women who look very Russian offering cheap cigarettes in exchange for cheap Made-in-China underwear. 



Vaalimaa is a cross-border point between Finland and the Russian Federation. It is one of the largest customs service centres in Finland. At one point, before Crimea and Donbas - Russians would come here by the thousands, but now their purchasing power decreased drastically. And... the lot here is empty.

Jani Liikola, Captain, Vaalimaa border crossing check point: "The biggest difference here is the traffic and the number of cars. It dropped at least 30 percent if you compare it to 2013-2015.

Before in Vaalimaa we saw more than 3 and a half million passengers per year, that number has dropped to 2.5 million."

Finland strongly supported sanctions against Putin's regime, despite closing several plants that were working solely for the Russian market, the Finns stand firm in their position.

The vehicles that do pass through this checkpoint, are scanned vigorously. After all, Finland is known for its ability to defend its borders.

The road that leads to the very border line is smooth and extremely neat, surrounded by farmer's fields with stacks of neatly rolled hay. There's not a spot that isn't used. The other side, though... it's hard to see what lays behind the crossing.

Denis Pertsev, Ukrainian Association of Finland: "Russia is extremely afraid to see people leave, it started during the second world war, and here we have about five kilometres of no-mans-land, weeds and grass, and 25 kilometres of strict limitations."

From here, remnants of the Soviet past are visible. The typical marble ceiling. The road signs - old, worn-down, soviet. This is where the Leningrad oblast starts, even though the city of Leningrad no longer exists.

The Finnish border guards don't talk much about their political attitudes. Everything here is left out of sight - though plenty of security cameras are around recording every move. "Karelia? Well, I can tell you one thing, I can't talk about political issues, it was a long time ago." 

Karelia (Getty Iamges) 

Ordinary citizens though say they share Ukrainians' pain. Russia stole a part of their land once, so they know what it's like.

The Finnish government that has been known to stay neutral dramatically shifted its international position in recent months. The country is starting to invest more in its military, increasing training exercises and actually contemplating the thought of joining NATO... which of course is ruffling Russia's feathers.








Reuters: Russia deploys troops westward as standoff with NATO deepens


Pro-Russian rebels ride on a tank in the town of Krasnodon, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014 (AP Photo)


Western alliance is responding to Russian military intervention in Ukraine 

       



Russia is building an army base near its border with Ukraine, the latest in a chain of new military sites along what the Kremlin sees as its frontline in a growing confrontation with NATO.

While there have been no clashes between the former Cold War rivals, Russia is building up forces on its western frontiers at a time when the NATO alliance is staging major military exercises and increasing deployments on its eastern flank.



A Reuters reporter who visited the Russian town of Klintsy, about 50 km (30 miles) from Ukraine, saw a makeshift army camp, large numbers of newly-arrived servicemen and military vehicles.



Two soldiers in camouflage gear who were manning a checkpoint in a forest turned the reporter away, saying they were guarding a "special military site".



Last year, Reuters also reported on construction of two other bases further to the south on Russia's border with Ukraine. Full story
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  mortimer le Mer 8 Juin - 10:19

La Russie présente le concurrent d'Airbus et Boeing

La Russie a présenté mercredi son premier avion de ligne moyen-courrier MC-21, qui doit confirmer la renaissance de son aviation civile après la difficile mise en service de son appareil régional Superjet et s'attaquer à la domination sans partage d'Airbus et de Boeing.
Le prototype de l'appareil, blanc et bleu, a effectué son roulage inaugural dans un vaste hangar du constructeur public Irkout, dans la ville Sibérienne d'Irkoutsk, son fuselage balayé par de puissants projecteurs, selon les images retransmises à la télévision russe.


http://www.7sur7.be/7s7/fr/1505/Monde/article/detail/2727850/2016/06/08/La-Russie-presente-le-concurrent-d-Airbus-et-Boeing.dhtml

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Mer 8 Juin - 10:29

Si on lit l'article, on se rend compte que ce sont principalement des compagnies russes qui l'achètent (elles s'y sont engagées [obligées] pour soutenir l'effort de construction aéronautique russe).
Pour le reste, ils ont bien du mal à le vendre.
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Mer 8 Juin - 10:40

Après les provocations par avions (il y en a encore eu un hier SUR le territoire letton):

Sky News: Russian submarine intercepted by Royal Navy warship


The Russian Borei-class nuclear-powered submarine Vladimir Monomakh returns to the Russian Northern Fleet base (Getty Images)

The incident between the British and Russian military follows several incursions by aircraft in skies around the UK 
       

A Russian submarine - capable of carrying cruise missiles - has been intercepted by a Royal Navy warship in the North Sea.

The vessel was detected by NATO forces and is now being escorted by HMS Kent.

The Ministry of Defence said the Type 23 Duke class frigate will continue to shadow the Kilo-class submarine.


Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said: "This shows that the Navy is maintaining a vigilant watch in international and territorial waters to keep Britain safe and protect us from potential threats."   Full story
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Krispoluk le Mer 8 Juin - 12:02

mortimer a écrit:
La Russie présente le concurrent d'Airbus et Boeing

Ouaff, ouaff, ouaff ! Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing bounce bounce bounce lol! lol! lol!
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Caduce62 le Mer 8 Juin - 12:26

Krispoluk a écrit:
mortimer a écrit:
La Russie présente le concurrent d'Airbus et Boeing

Ouaff, ouaff, ouaff ! Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing bounce bounce bounce lol! lol! lol!
Mais le meilleur et le plus GROS est ukrainien : Antonov AN-225 Laughing

https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/wa/a/31602453/king-of-the-sky-worlds-biggest-plane-lands-in-perth/
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Krispoluk le Mer 8 Juin - 12:35

Caduce62 a écrit:
Krispoluk a écrit:
mortimer a écrit:
La Russie présente le concurrent d'Airbus et Boeing

Ouaff, ouaff, ouaff ! Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing bounce bounce bounce lol! lol! lol!
Mais le meilleur et le plus GROS est ukrainien : Antonov AN-225 Laughing

https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/wa/a/31602453/king-of-the-sky-worlds-biggest-plane-lands-in-perth/

Ca y est, depuis que t'as marié une ukrainienne et que tu te sens ukrainien d'adoption, tes chevilles sont en train de gonfler : " la mienne est plus grosse que la tienne !"
Gamin, va ! Laughing Laughing Laughing
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Krispoluk le Mer 8 Juin - 12:37

Euh... Je viens de m'apercevoir que ma phrase : " la mienne est plus grosse que la tienne !" pourrait être mal interprétée... Embarassed 

Je ne parlais pas de nos compagnes respectives n'est-ce-pas... Laughing Laughing Laughing
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Caduce62 le Mer 8 Juin - 14:35

Krispoluk a écrit:Euh... Je viens de m'apercevoir que ma phrase : " la mienne est plus grosse que la tienne !" pourrait être mal interprétée... Embarassed 

Je ne parlais pas de nos compagnes respectives n'est-ce-pas... Laughing Laughing Laughing
T'as parlé du "plus gros calibre" et des femmes ?  cheers Laughing


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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Krispoluk le Mer 8 Juin - 14:58

Caduce62 a écrit:
Krispoluk a écrit:Euh... Je viens de m'apercevoir que ma phrase : " la mienne est plus grosse que la tienne !" pourrait être mal interprétée... Embarassed 

Je ne parlais pas de nos compagnes respectives n'est-ce-pas... Laughing Laughing Laughing
T'as parlé du "plus gros calibre" et des femmes ?  cheers Laughing



Excellent ! t'as un radar pour les trouver sur le net ou t'as rien d'autre à foutre de tes journées, tant que Diana n'est pas encore arrivée ?

Fais gaffe ! Ca risque de changer d'ici peu Twisted Evil Laughing Laughing lol!
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Caduce62 le Mer 8 Juin - 16:50

Krispoluk a écrit:
Caduce62 a écrit:
Krispoluk a écrit:Euh... Je viens de m'apercevoir que ma phrase : " la mienne est plus grosse que la tienne !" pourrait être mal interprétée... Embarassed 

Je ne parlais pas de nos compagnes respectives n'est-ce-pas... Laughing Laughing Laughing
T'as parlé du "plus gros calibre" et des femmes ?  cheers Laughing

Excellent ! t'as un radar pour les trouver sur le net ou t'as rien d'autre à foutre de tes journées, tant que Diana n'est pas encore arrivée ?

Fais gaffe ! Ca risque de changer d'ici peu Twisted Evil Laughing Laughing lol!

Aujourd'hui : REPOS mais pas tout à fait car j'ai 50 copies à corriger Crying or Very sad 

Faut profiter des derniers moments de liberté Laughing
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Jeu 9 Juin - 9:35

Un sous-marin russe repéré près de la côte belge  Shocked


Le "Stary Oskol" lors de son lancement à Saint-Petersbourg en 2014. ©️ afp.

Un sous-marin russe capable d'emporter des missiles de croisière a été escorté mardi et mercredi dans la Manche par une frégate de la Royal Navy britannique alors qu'il s'approchait de Douvres (sud-est de l'Angleterre), non loin de la côte belge, ont rapporté des médias britannique et russe.


Le sous-marin, le "Stary Oskol" et le remorqueur qui l'accompagnait, l'"Altai", ont été interceptés mardi soir par la frégate de type 23 HMS Kent, alors que les deux bâtiments russes s'approchaient du détroit séparant la France et la Grande-Bretagne à hauteur de Douvres, selon le journal 'The Telegraph', citant le ministère britannique de la Défense, photo du submersible navigant en surface à l'appui.

Le commandant du "Kent", le capitaine Daniel Thomas, a affirmé que "localiser le sous-marin était un effort combiné avec les alliés de l'Otan".

Le ministère russe de la Défense "surpris"



L'ambassade de Russie à Londres a qualifié ce transit dans les eaux internationales à basse vitesse comme étant "de routine" mais a accusé le gouvernement de "faire peur aux gens au Royaume-Uni" en évoquant une menace présumée venue de Russie.

A Moscou, le ministère russe de la Défense a exprimé sa "surprise" face aux articles parus dans la presse britannique.

Selon l'agence de presse Itar-Tass (officielle), le "Staryi Oskol" est un sous-marin à propulsion diesel électrique répondant au nom de "projet 636.3". Il regagnait sa base d'attache de la flotte de la mer Noire après des essais en mers baltique et du Nord.




Pour être au large des côtes belges et dire qu'il va en mer Noire, encore un beau mensonge, ce n'est pas la route.
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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Krispoluk le Jeu 9 Juin - 10:29

Александр a écrit:Un sous-marin russe repéré près de la côte belge  Shocked

Pour être au large des côtes belges et dire qu'il va en mer Noire, encore un beau mensonge, ce n'est pas la route.

Ca dépend, quand je vais en Crimée en voiture, je traverse la Belgique Laughing
Le navigateur était peut être bourré à la vodka et il a branché son GPS en mode "route" lol!

Non, plus prosaïquement, pour passer de la Baltique à la Mer Noire, il est logique de passer au large de la Belgique, c'est la route la plus courte, sauf à contourner les iles britanniques par l'ouest...

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Re: Et en Russie !

Message  Александр le Jeu 9 Juin - 10:52

Juste, j'ai confondu avec ce qui est la mer de Norvège à la place de la Baltique (que je plaçais à la place de la mer de Barents plus au Nord).
Sorry. Embarassed
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Re: Et en Russie !

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